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soiree for strays

Posted By SLCo Animal Services
August 30, 2018

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soiree for strays

Join Salt Lake County Animal Services and Liz Dranow Photography for our first ever art show, to promote the beauty, joy, and love, many a stray dog has inserted into the heart of their hooman. This is a free event.

Join us for a Soiree for Strays during the monthly Art Stroll in the 9th & 9th neighborhood. Featured Photographer Liz Dranow will have her photos on display to purchase throughout October at The Stockist, located at 875 E 900 S.

All photos are of rescued, and well loved, shelter dogs: all different shapes, sizes and breeds. All proceeds of sales will be donated back to Salt Lake County Animal Services. 

Q & A with photographer, Liz Dranow:

I've been volunteering since January 2015 (no, really!).

What have you learned about taking photos of pets in a shelter environment?
I've learned a few things: 1) some of the dogs with the roughest pasts are some of the sweetest dogs I've met, 2) the volunteers and staff are an amazing group of people and my life is richer for knowing you all (sappy, maybe, but very true), and 3) there is an amazingly supportive group of shelter and rescue photographers from around the world, and the collective efforts of all of these photographers is incredible. It's very fulfilling to know that I'm a part of something that makes such a big impact on the lives of animals around the world.

Favorite dog or photo? 
Oh, hell. There are to many to count. The peanut butter photos are always entertaining - there are times that I have laughed so hard at the faces the dogs make that I can't actually take photos. However, one dog who has always stuck with me is Paisley. She clearly had a rough life - had been bred too much, had scars on her face probably from being a bait dog, and yet she was so regal, and so sweet. She gave me the most gentle kisses, and I was so moved (I still get teary-eyed thinking about it) that a dog with her background of likely knowing nothing but harsh treatment from humans was so amazingly gentle. But overall, I just love every time we get a dog who behaves completely differently than how the staff expects - when they expect a scared dog, and as soon as the dog realizes that this is his/her moment in the spotlight, the dog completely hams it up for the camera. Or when we discover that the dog knows all sorts of tricks or shows a totally different side of his/her personality than what the staff sees in the kennels. I love being a part of bringing out the inner beauty of a dog.

What advice would you give someone trying to take photos of their own pets? 
For anyone taking photos of their own pets, I would strongly urge patience, and keeping it fun. And paying attention to their pet's signals; when a dog (or cat, or bird, or whatever) starts to walk away, put down the camera/phone and go play with your pet. If you keep pushing it, your pet will learn that the camera/phone means nothing fun is going to happen. I also suggest really good snacks.

Find out more about Liz and visit her website: https://www.lizdranowphotography.com/